Further Reading

We are working to compile a list of useful introductory resources for parents interested in finding out more about Steiner education, and curricula.

Steiner Education: A Holistic Response to the Developing Needs of the Growing Child By Pearse O’Sheil

Library Books

The following books are available for borrowing. Call to the office on Mondays, Tuesdays (9:50-13:50) or ask Julia at pickup time.

 

Books

Auer, Arthur;

Learning about the world through Modelling – sculptural ideas for school and home.

The Association of Waldorf School of North America 2001.

 

Aulie, Jennifer; Meyerkorn, Margret (edt.):

Autumn– a collection of poems, songs and stories for young children.

Wynstones Press 2010.

 

Aulie, Jennifer; Meyerkorn, Margret (edt.):

Spindrift – a collection of poems, songs and stories for young children.

Wynstones Press 2010.

 

Aulie, Jennifer; Meyerkorn, Margret (edt.):

Sping – a collection of poems, songs and stories for young children.

Wynstones Press 2010.

 

Aulie, Jennifer; Meyerkorn, Margret (edt.):

Summer – a collection of poems, songs and stories for young children.

Wynstones Press 2010.

 

Aulie, Jennifer; Meyerkorn, Margret (edt.):

Winter – a collection of poems, songs and stories for young children.

Wynstones Press 2010.

 

Avison, Kevin; Rawson, Martyn (edt.):

The Tasks and Content of the Steiner-Waldorf Curriculum.

Floris Books 2014.

 

Baldwin Dancy, Rahima:

Zou are your child’s first teacher – what children can do with and for their children from birth to age six.

Hawthorn Press 2006.

 

Bruin, Dick; Attie Lichthart:

Painting in Waldorf Education.

Waldorf Publications 2014.

 

Cohen, Warren Lee:

Baking Bread with children.

The Dorset Press, Dorchester 2011.

 

Druitt, Ann; Fynes-Clinton, Christine, Rowling, Marije:

The Birthday Book – Celebrations for everyone.

Hawthorn Press 2004.

 

Edmunds, Francis:

An introduction to Steiner Education – The Waldorf School.

Sofia Books 2004.

 

Kohler, Henning:

Working with Anxious, Nervous, and Depressed Children – A spiritual Perspective to Guide Parents.

The Association of Waldorf School of North America 2001.

 

Konig, Karl:

On Reading & Writing.

Camphill Books 2002.

 

 

Kaufmann, Birte:

Gardening Classes in Waldorf Schools.

Floris Books 2015.

 

Martins, Michael:

Educating through Arts and Crafts.

The Association of Waldorf School of North America 1999.

 

Mitchell, David; Livingstone, Patricia:

Will-Developed Intelligence – Handwork & Practical Arts in the Waldorf School, Elemental through High School.

The Association of Waldorf School of North America Publications 2007.

 

Molt, Emil:

Emil Molt and the beginnings of the Waldorf School movement – Sketches from an autobiography.

Floris Books, Edinburgh 1991.

 

Muller, Brunhild:

Painting with Children.

Floris Books 2012.

 

Nicol, Janni:

Bringing the Steiner Waldorf Approach to your Earlz Years Practice.

Routledge 2016.

 

Nicol, Janni: Taplin, Jill Tina:

Understanding the Steiner Waldorf Approach – Early Years Education in Practice.

David Fulton Books 2012.

 

 

Nobel, Agnes:

Educating through Art – The Steiner Approach.

Floris Books, Edinburgh, 1996.

 

Oldfield, Lynne:

Free to Learn – Introducing Steiner Waldorf Early Childhood Education.

Hawthorn Press 2001.

 

Palmer, Sue:

Toxic Childhood – How the modern world is damaging our children and what we can do about it.

Sue Palmer ltd. 2006.

 

Petrash, Jack:

Understanding Waldorf Education – teaching from the inside out.

Floris Books 2011.

 

Poplawsky, Thomas:

Completing the circle.

The Association of Waldorf Schools of North America Publication 2006.

 

Marshall, Ruth:

Celebrating Irish Festivals.

Hawthorn Press 1988.

 

Robb, Marina; Mew Victoria; Richardson, Anna:

Learning with Nature – a how-to guide to inspiring children trhough outdoor games and activities.

UIT Cambridge LTD 2015.

 

 

Schofield, Jo; Danks, Fiona:

The Strick Book – loads of things you can make or do with a stick.

Frances Lincoln limited.

 

Smyth, Nell:

The Breathing Circle – learning through the movement of the natural breath.

Hawthorn Press 1988.

 

 

 

Thomson, John:

Natural Childhood – the first practical and holistic guide for parents of the developing child.

Gaia Books ltd. 1994.

 

Wildgruber, Thomas:

Painting and Drawing in Waldorf Schools – classes 1-8.

Floris Books 2012.

 

Magazines:

Kindling – The journal for Steiner Waldorf Early Childhood Care and Education – Issue 14 – Autumn/Winter 2008.

 

Kindling – The journal for Steiner Waldorf Early Childhood Care and Education – Issue 16 – Autumn/Winter 2009.

 

Kindling – The journal for Steiner Waldorf Early Childhood Care and Education – Issue 22 – Autumn/Winter 2012.

 

Kindling – The journal for Steiner Waldorf Early Childhood Care and Education – Issue 23 – Spring/Summer 2014.

 

Kindling – The journal for Steiner Waldorf Early Childhood Care and Education – Issue 26 – Autumn/Winter 2014.

 

Kindling – The journal for Steiner Waldorf Early Childhood Care and Education – Issue 28 – Autumn/Winter 2015.

 

Kindling – The journal for Steiner Waldorf Early Childhood Care and Education – Issue 29 – Spring/Summer 2016.

 

Curriculum

Interesting research on Steiner Education and the Aistear/Primary School Curriculum: See http://www.saoirsewaldorf.com/2013/03/21/steiner-education-and-the-aistear-primary-school-curriculum/

See also the Lifeways Ireland website for additional information on Steiner School curricula and research: http://www.lifeways.ie/#!steinerwaldorf-education/c20x9

 

Reading

Two very interesting articles on the Steiner approach to reading

Learning to read the Steiner Way

Teaching our children to write, read & spell

 

Outdoor education

Read this interesting article about the importance for children to form a relationship with nature:

Young Children’s Relationship with Nature: Its Importance to Children’s Development & the Earth’s Future

 

Steiner Educational Research

Gidley, Jennifer M. (2008) Turning Tides: Creating Dialogue between Rudolf Steiner and 21st Century Academic Discourses. A Brief Report on Steiner-based Academic Research in Australia in Context. Commissioned by the Rudolf Steiner Schools of Australia: An Association (RSSA). RoSE – Research on Steiner Education [online]. , Vol 1, No 1 (2010)
ABSTRACT (ABBREVIATED): This report contains a brief descriptive summary of the available Steiner-related Australian research. This is followed by a brief summary of what I call “kindred” contemporary educational research that I have uncovered through my own research, which attempts to create conceptual bridges between Steiner philosophy and pedagogy and the contemporary academic discourses.

Oberski, I. 2006. Learning to think in Steiner-Waldorf schools. Journal of Cognitive Education and Psychology [online], 5 (3), 336-349.
ABSTRACT (Abbreviated): The curriculum in Waldorf schools is based on the development of the imagination through creative and artistic expression, which is thought to lead to healthy thinking later in life. Thus, what is learned at an early stage (e.g., to clap and speak a rhyme) is thought to work its way into thinking at a later stage of the child’s life (e.g., to remember, participate, or count). This small study was designed to map out how, according to Waldorf teachers, thinking develops in their pupils.

Sebastian Paul Suggate (2013) Does early reading instruction help reading in the long-term? A review of empirical evidence. RoSE – Research on Steiner Education [online]. , Vol 4, No 1 (2013)
ABSTRACT: Widespread and extensive changes have seen early reading instruction become an educational target for preschool and kindergarten aged children. Surprisingly, empirical researchers and policy makers have by and large paid little attention to the effects that early reading instruction has on later reading development. In this critical review, I outline five main arguments for early reading and examine their logical and evidential basis. Then I present research that has compared groups of children over the long-term as a function of whether they received early formal reading instruction or not. I conclude, on the basis of the evidence and critique, that children do not show better long-term reading performance that is attributable to their having received earlier formal reading instruction.

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